CLAY BY THE FARM

Escape the hustle and bustle of city life and immerse yourself in the slower pace of West Sonoma County. Clay By The Farm is nestled in the rolling green hills of Occidental, CA on a 29 acre farm.

Enjoy farm-to-table dinners while learning about building outdoor kilns and alternative firing methods during the day.


RAKU FIRING

What is raku?

Raku is a firing technique that originates in Japan and is used to fire traditional chawan teabowls intended for tea ceremonies.  We use a firing process inspired by those techniques in which we fire bisqueware pottery or ceramic sculptural work in a kiln, typically using natural gas or propane as the fuel source.  Once the wares in the kiln are at a temperature of about 1850 degrees Fahrenheit the glowing hot ceramic is removed from the kiln and placed into a reduction barrel.  The reduction barrel is typically made of metal, such as a metal trash can.  Inside the reduction barrel are combustibles; newsprint, sawdust, pine needles, etc.  These ignite and the reduction barrel is closed with a metal lid.  The combustibles create a reduced amount of oxygen and the glazes and ceramic react in such a way to give you beautiful results varying in blues, purples, reds, greens, gold, and more!



HOW CAN I SIGN UP?

Join us for a packed day with a community raku, picnic lunch, and festivities out in the lush rolling hills of Occidental, CA (1.5 hrs from San Francisco)!

 

What's included in the Raku Workshop experience?

  • Bring 3 ceramic pieces (about coffee mug sized) or 2 larger forms.
  • Any mid-range clay bodies are welcome.
  • Your pieces must be bisque fired prior to the workshop.
  • Glaze and prep pieces to be loaded into the kiln. We'll be providing a variety of raku glaze options, including crackles, turquoise & copper glazes, and horse hair techniques.
  • Review of fired pots. Learn to refine your glaze application!
  • We'll run 5-7 raku firings over the course of the day!
  • 1 homemade yummy lunch will be provided.

 

*Please note that raku fired pots are never fully vitrified, making them not food-safe.